Aluminum bolt specs

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WNYBILL
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Aluminum bolt specs

Post by WNYBILL » Wed Feb 28, 2018 10:41 am

What does the spec mean, what is the difference between 7075-T6 AND 7075-T9? Is it a measure of stiffness? Or shaft diameter? Or wall thickness? How does it effect total weight?

Many come with moon nocks and Excal recommends a flat nock. How do you change them? Where do you get them and how do you know if they are drilled and tapped for the Excal puller?

Bill

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Cw.abeljr
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Re: Aluminum bolt specs

Post by Cw.abeljr » Wed Feb 28, 2018 10:53 am

I recall from my days of working on aircraft that the "T" number indicated the hardness of the aluminum..... The harder the aluminum the more brittle it is....Sorry but I can't recall if the higher or lower number was harder.
Clyde
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Ekkie
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Re: Aluminum bolt specs

Post by Ekkie » Wed Feb 28, 2018 12:33 pm

I believe the T6 vs T9 designations have to do with the tempering. The main things one should be concerned with regarding aluminum arrow shafts is the outer diameter and the wall thickness. Easton shafts were for years specified like 2219 or 2317 or 2115, where the first set of two digits was approximately the OD in 64ths of an inch, and the second set of digits was the wall thickness in thousands of an inch. So in those examples above you'd have an OD of 22/64" and a wall thickness of .019" first, then 23/64" OD & .017" wall thickness, then 21/64" & .015" wall thickness. Newer aluminum arrows from Easton seem to be specified differently, and I'm not familiar with the new specs.

XX75 refers to the aluminum formula, I think. I've also seen xx78. Then there's the tempering. There are also tolerance and straightness ratings.

Almost all crossbows want a shaft with a 22/64" OD. Some people shoot 21/64" out of their Excals. I've experimented with 23/64" shafts, but decided it wasn't worth the hassles so now just stick with the typical 2219 or 2216 shafts.

As far as the puller goes, the threading at the rear of the arrow is part of the flat nock. You can use an aluminum insert at the back if you want; the threading is the same. Actually, I *think* the rear threaded nocks used by Excal is a composite insert which can be found here:

https://www.amazon.com/TenPoint-2219-Point-Inserts-72-Pack/dp/B005FMJZGS/ref=sr_1_14?ie=UTF8&qid=1519838617&sr=8-14&keywords=2219+72

Hope that helps,
~E

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Re: Aluminum bolt specs

Post by Hi5 » Wed Feb 28, 2018 3:09 pm

Save yourself a whole lot of aggravation and DON'T use any puller that threads into the rear of your arrow. That is, unless you don't mind having to reglue the nock back. The best arrow puller is the "Danny Miller" pliers type.
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Cw.abeljr
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Re: Aluminum bolt specs

Post by Cw.abeljr » Wed Feb 28, 2018 3:12 pm

Ekkie wrote:
Wed Feb 28, 2018 12:33 pm
I believe the T6 vs T9 designations have to do with the tempering. The main things one should be concerned with regarding aluminum arrow shafts is the outer diameter and the wall thickness. Easton shafts were for years specified like 2219 or 2317 or 2115, where the first set of two digits was approximately the OD in 64ths of an inch, and the second set of digits was the wall thickness in thousands of an inch. So in those examples above you'd have an OD of 22/64" and a wall thickness of .019" first, then 23/64" OD & .017" wall thickness, then 21/64" & .015" wall thickness. Newer aluminum arrows from Easton seem to be specified differently, and I'm not familiar with the new specs.

XX75 refers to the aluminum formula, I think. I've also seen xx78. Then there's the tempering. There are also tolerance and straightness ratings.

Almost all crossbows want a shaft with a 22/64" OD. Some people shoot 21/64" out of their Excals. I've experimented with 23/64" shafts, but decided it wasn't worth the hassles so now just stick with the typical 2219 or 2216 shafts.

As far as the puller goes, the threading at the rear of the arrow is part of the flat nock. You can use an aluminum insert at the back if you want; the threading is the same. Actually, I *think* the rear threaded nocks used by Excal is a composite insert which can be found here:

https://www.amazon.com/TenPoint-2219-Point-Inserts-72-Pack/dp/B005FMJZGS/ref=sr_1_14?ie=UTF8&qid=1519838617&sr=8-14&keywords=2219+72

Hope that helps,
~E
You are exactly correct about the "T" and the number following being the tempering and as I was saying it denotes the hardness of the aluminum after the tempering has been accomplished.
Clyde
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Ekkie
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Re: Aluminum bolt specs

Post by Ekkie » Wed Feb 28, 2018 3:44 pm

Hi5 wrote:
Wed Feb 28, 2018 3:09 pm
Save yourself a whole lot of aggravation and DON'T use any puller that threads into the rear of your arrow. That is, unless you don't mind having to reglue the nock back. The best arrow puller is the "Danny Miller" pliers type.
I've used the T puller forever and not had an issue with it. But... I build my arrows with aluminum inserts at the back and use hot melt glue for them, which I suspect is less prone to failure over time than a superglue. Also, there's a lot less force involved when pulling an aluminum arrow out of a target than a carbon one. Honestly I don't really need to use the T puller that often due to the aluminum arrows pulling out more easily, so that probably contributes as well. I can't recall ever having a nock pull out on me.

~E

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