Why I asked "Who eats deer ribs?"

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Hi5
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Why I asked "Who eats deer ribs?"

Post by Hi5 » Wed Nov 26, 2008 11:27 am

The thread I started about who eats deer ribs seems to run about like this:

No --10

Cut and mix into ground meat-- 5

Yes --2

Unresponsive replies--2

I had a reason for trying to find out this information. I was impressed by the concerns expressed about why, or why not, to wash the body cavity of a gut shot deer.

For the majority of people who responded to my poll about eating deer ribs, it shouldn't matter a darn whether or not they wash out the body cavity of their gut shot deer. If they snip off the tenderloin, THAT'S ALL THEY WOULD EAT THAT HAS CONTACTED GUT CONTENTS!!! Rinse it off, if you think it's a good idea, and forget about any more cleaning.

Only the "rib eaters" have any reason to argue and worry about washing out the body cavity.
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dutchhunter
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rib eater or not

Post by dutchhunter » Wed Nov 26, 2008 11:41 am

i donot think it matters if you eat the ribs or not i have smelled deer that have not been washed and hung for a few days and the smell can tant the whole animal .as well bacteria grows and spreads if you have people over looking at the deer thy touch it inide and out .as well as air born germs .that is y every shop washes all aimals on the kill floor not just the dirt you can see .there are just to many bad things that can harm my family and friends out there y would youy not wash them before you get it ready to keep for food my 2 cents DUTCH

Cossack
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Post by Cossack » Wed Nov 26, 2008 12:59 pm

Thee are several reasons that deer get gamy taste:
1. How they are shot. Gut shot, pushed after the hit, adrenalin injected.
2. Failure to remove hide as soon as possible. It traps heat very effectively casuing spoilage even when it's relatively cool.
3. Cutting through bones like spine, ec in the process. Marrow is very fatty, spoils even in the freezer.
4. "Aging' (esp with hide on) in less than controlled environment, Aging is a process whereby the meat is caused to break down best done at a constant 34 degrees. Any lower it freezes, higher it spoils. But deer fat esp marrow starts spoiling even when frozen.

Washing deer that have been gut shot to remove fecal matter and therefore ecol i is largely just placating the washer's mind. It's not effective in killing bacteria. Only raising the temp (of the bacteria) to at least 250 degrees for 1/2 hr does that.

One of the funniest pieces I've read about this was entitled "How to make beef taste like deer." Shoot it in the gut, run it around for a couple of hours, shoot it again, leave the hide on, slap it on the vehicle with body cavity exposed and drive 150 miles so road duct can get into it. Then let it hang for a week where the sun can get at it and changing temps, so the neighbors know you killed it. It will taste just like deer that are treated likewise.

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Post by catcher » Wed Nov 26, 2008 1:28 pm

I agree with Dutch
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mikej
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Post by mikej » Wed Nov 26, 2008 1:59 pm

catcher wrote:I agree with Dutch
x2

Hi5
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Post by Hi5 » Wed Nov 26, 2008 3:12 pm

Cossack wrote:...............................

Washing deer that have been gut shot to remove fecal matter and therefore ecoli is largely just placating the washer's mind. It's not effective in killing bacteria. Only raising the temp (of the bacteria) to at least 250 degrees for 1/2 hr does that.....................


I agree. Or washing with something more than plain water to kill the bacteria.

However, I disagree with removing the hide unnecessarily early. The hide is the best barrier to prevent contamination of the meat, and should be removed as late as possible, preferably just before the meat is cut from the bones. That will prevent unnecessary dry out as well as contamination.

In northern climates that is easily do-able, but obviously not so where the ambient temperature is too warm.
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mikej
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Post by mikej » Wed Nov 26, 2008 3:16 pm

i find removing the hide asap seems to give the meat a less wild and gamey taste

dutchhunter
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hide

Post by dutchhunter » Wed Nov 26, 2008 3:59 pm

we leave it on as long as possable it prevents the meat from drying out and keeps it clean DUTCH

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wabi
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Post by wabi » Wed Nov 26, 2008 7:18 pm

To me the best tasting venison is one that is shot cleanly and dies quickly, then is processed ASAP! When I did my own I would frequently have it home and hanging on the skinning gambrel within an hour or two of field dressing it. If the weather was cold I would skin it immediately then let it cool for a few hours before cutting it up, but if it was warm I'd get the meat off the carcass right away. It's easier to cut up when it's chilled, so I'd often put the large boneless pieces in clean plastic bags and referigerate them for a few hours or overnight before slicing & grinding the meat.
Now I usually take them to my buddy's processing plant and skin them and hang them in the cooler overnight. I usually have them processed within 24 hours. The exception is if he's not home and I can't get to the skinning gambrel. Then I'll hang them in the cooler with the skin on, and skin and process them the next day. Can't really tell much difference in taste.
wabi

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Post by crazyfarmer » Wed Nov 26, 2008 7:27 pm

I dont see any taste difference between one thats processed that same day or the next lol.. it all tastes good to me. I know when we process deer for the hunters for the hungry we wont process ones that smell like crap from the guts being ripped. Its just not worth the chance. If I pop the gut ill rinse it out just to get the smell off but thats just on the rib meat anyway. I like to be as clean as possible though so thats the reason for washing mine out if its gut shot.

But ive left deer hanging over night and cant see a taste difference. Its easier to remove a fresh hide compared to a 1 day old one also


btw, we age our beef for 10 days :P Hides removed of coarse LOL

hunter 740
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Post by hunter 740 » Wed Nov 26, 2008 7:32 pm

I like to skin mine then let it hang four or five days weather permitting.When I'm ready to butcher it I peel all the dried membrane of the meat,my grandpa use to call it talon.then I debone it vacum seal annd freeze.

kitty kat
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Post by kitty kat » Wed Nov 26, 2008 7:33 pm

I have been tempted over the years to have bbq deer ribs cooked over an open fire. They say it is excellent for the open fire lets the excess fat run out. All visable fat is to be removed and any shiny coating removed. We do not put water of any kind on the meat for that just invites bacteria to form. If it is dirty , scrape it clean . We have let some of the meat hang for several days and had some butchered and packaged the next. There doesn't seem to be a magical formula for us anyway. If the hunting goes well this weekend I will be having some of those ribs cooked over an open hard maple fire. Wish me luck on both plans. :lol:
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crazyfarmer
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Post by crazyfarmer » Wed Nov 26, 2008 7:34 pm

hunter 740 wrote:I like to skin mine then let it hang four or five days weather permitting.When I'm ready to butcher it I peel all the dried membrane of the meat,my grandpa use to call it talon.then I debone it vacum seal annd freeze.
sorta the same reason for aging beef.. makes it much easier to handle and cut

hunter 740
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Post by hunter 740 » Wed Nov 26, 2008 7:53 pm

We've allways butchered our own beef and pork so I hang my deer the same.The back straps on the other hand don't hang they go in the house with me for some special treatment,eatun!!!.

Curdog
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Deer

Post by Curdog » Wed Nov 26, 2008 8:05 pm

We do ours a little different here in my part of the South. My buddies and I skin and quarter the deer right after we get one, then place the hams, loins and shoulders in a big cooler, throw in a couple of hand fulls of salt, cover with ice and then fill cooler with cold water, then we pour off the water every day or so, and add new ice and water for up to a week, hard to believe how much blood comes out of the meat and settles to the bottom of the cooler. Then when we get ready to cut up the meat it gets dried off and processed, cold meat slices much better than hot. Curdog

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