A Kechika River Adventure

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IronNoggin
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A Kechika River Adventure

Post by IronNoggin » Fri Oct 05, 2018 2:37 pm

This will be the tale of our most recent hunt.
Although we hunted with rifles rather than our bows, I felt a few on here would enjoy the tale.
It is going to be lengthy (as was the trip) and incorporate numerous pictures.
It will eventually also have a few videos attached, after I get the handle of editing them.

Due to it's length, I'll be running this one up in installments.
So, the tale will be broken down into like-themed components for ease of posting & reading.
For those with a lack of patience for such things, I suggest coming back to see it in it's entirety tomorrow or the next...

The Plan

This was not our first run at the Kechika River system.
In fact, we have been there numerous times, and taken Stone Sheep, Moose, Elk, Goats, Bears & a few Wolves out of there over the years.
Through that time period, a handful of us have developed a real love of this area, and so it wasn't much of a consideration for me when the suggestion came up we should give it another go this fall...

The Kechika is an offshoot of the Liard River. It flowss into the Liard just above Skooks Landing (less than a hop skip and a jump from the Yukon Border).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kechika_River

https://mapcarta.com/24325756

Last year, we went in with a single jet rig, and way to damn early.
The two weeks we were there, one spent the overly hot days suffering in shorts & T-shirts, and the nights sweltering with no sleeping bags required. No game was taken, as they simply refused top even move in the heat. Very few critters were even spotted.
Thus it was decided that we would make the run a fair bit (3 weeks) later. Turned out to be a decent choice.

Many conversations were blistered across the phone lines between Alberta and BC with the growing plans.
Two jet rigs this year. All the best equipment of course. Time on the ground centering on a 3 week possibility.
Eventually I submitted a Hunter Host request for our Jet Jocks, which was to my surprise granted almost immediately.
Surprised because all the other folks I knew that applied for the Host Permits had to wait literally months for approval, and in some cases they were denied.

Permits in hand, Licenses two, we anxiously awaited the upcoming departure date...
"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

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IronNoggin
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Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by IronNoggin » Fri Oct 05, 2018 3:06 pm

The Run

Skooks Landing is a LONG way from Port Alberni.
In fact, the route we take runs right around 2,350 kilometers (or 1,460 miles for those who prefer that unit of measure).
It takes us two days on non-stop full boogie to drive there.
We had a minor delay the day we expected to leave, but at 4:30 am the next morning we rolled out, and hit the first ferry across the moat.
The drive through Vancouver was even more complicated than usual, as Highway 1 was down for construction.
So, we had to meander through side streets for a couple hours before we managed to put the Big Smoke behind us.
The truck purred, and we made excellent time after that, only stopping for fuel and the odd bite to eat.

At dark, my troubled eye doesn't allow me to drive any more.
So my Partner ponied up, and grabbed the wheel for the continued run.
Late into the black, we hit Chetwyn, and begged a room for a few hours off my Partner's sister in law.

Upon getting up (at 4:30 am again) I contacted our Alberta Buddies to determine where they were.
They have a much shorter distance to travel, as they started off in Alberta Beach (just west of Edmonton).

Turned out they had run well into dark themselves, and were poised at Wonowon (Mile 101 of the Alaska Highway) waiting for the fuel pumps to be turned on. A viscous run ensued, and we managed to catch them still there.

We had arranged for the commercial fuel manager to meet us in Fort Nelson, so when we landed there the Jet Jocks turned in to collect many many barrels of dinosaur juice. My Partner & I scrambled through town, gathering up a few last minute supplies, before hooking back up with the Ladz.

Just prior to Toad River we encountered the largest game check I've ever wandered across.
No less than nine CO's, a couple Greater Yellow-Legs, and a handful of FN representatives.
Our Buddy's Alberta Tags and Jet Rigs were like Honey, and we had everyone's full attention immediately.
Turned out I knew the senior officer that was onsite from a previous lifetime, and we chatted a bit about fellows we knew way back then. All Licenses etc were in proper shape, and they soon wished us well and sent us one our way.

Another long run, a quick bite at Toad River, and we made Skooks Landing just after dark.
The place was JAMMED! :shock:
As Elk Season was well underway, over 75 trucks & trailers filled the parking area beyond capacity, with many simply run into the bush.
I have never ever seen that landing so full, and we openly wondered just how far up, and which systems that many hunters had poured into.

Not wanting to load and shove off in the dark, we simply bunked in the trucks for the night, anticipating an early rise the next...

Along our drive, we saw numerous deer, a few bears, several elk & sheep, and the usual multitudes of buffalo along the Alaska highway portion.
Not wanting to even slow down for a minute, no photoes were taken.
The drive is an interesting one, as the road wanders through many varying kinds of ecosystems, ranging from full desert, rain forest, alpine and northern woods. Beautiful, and helps make the drive more than tolerable.

Here's a map of the run.

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You can see we have to basically drive the full length of the Province of BC - a Province so big it easily eats the state of California:

http://www.bcrobyn.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/CaliforniaMap1.jpg
Last edited by IronNoggin on Fri Oct 05, 2018 6:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

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Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by IronNoggin » Fri Oct 05, 2018 3:17 pm

As we neared our launch site, it was rather obvious that this was going to be a VERY different hunt compared to last year.
Already the mountains were beginning to dress themselves in winter white, and it looked downright chilly up top:

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Here's a shot of Green Death - my Buddies custom built 24.5 foot sled.
It runs an uber enhanced 502 cubic inch engine that pours damn near 700 ponies through the pump.
The eight degree hull takes some real getting used to, but allows us to fly in as little as 3/4 inch of water.
Over the years, that ride has provided us with endless hours of enjoyment, and far too many successful hunts to even begin to recite.
Those that might have wandered across a few tales of my past hunts will likely recognize her...

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Last edited by IronNoggin on Fri Oct 05, 2018 3:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

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Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by IronNoggin » Fri Oct 05, 2018 3:34 pm

The next morning came early, and we scrambled to load the boats prior to descending upon the launch:

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Then it was a short spin down to the water, and The Beasts were once again in their own environment:

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This was to be the maiden voyage of this system for the second boat (and first run of it for the Pilot too).
Due to the paint job, it was christened Flaming Death - a name that nearly came true for some of us...
It sports a 10 degree hull with Teflon, and a high performance injected 350 cubic inch engine.
At all of 18 feet, that much power is very very impressive!

And Huston, We Have LIFTOFF! :thumbup:
Unleashed from their bunks, these Beasts really ROAR once they are allowed.
Both literally jumped out of the water, like racehorses bounding for the finish line!
Miles literally poured past at a blistering rate, and the scenery was drop dead gorgeous!

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"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

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Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by IronNoggin » Fri Oct 05, 2018 3:54 pm

Of course no trip is complete without our Game Spotting Grizzly Protection Unit. :wink:
He well recognized what we were up to, and set about trying to be the first to spot any game as we roared along:

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Gradually the terrain began to transform into mountains along our way:

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And then, an hour or so past the Turnagin River, and when all seemed to be going well, Green Death sputtered violently!! :wtf:
She's way to damn HOT snarled her Master.
Off comes the lid, a fair bit of oil back sprayed in the engine compartment, and an intake manifold bolt laying on top, next to it's proper place.
Whoa??
A run down of the engine, bolt back in place, and fired back up. Less than 20 minutes, another bolt worked loose (intake again) and she was running HOT again. Fixed, checked oil (fine) antifreeze (fine) and back up running.
Another 20 minutes and the rad cap on the heat exchanger let go with a gush!
Anti-freeze Everywhere.
What The Hell??

Cooled her down, made a few more adjustments, and ran up up again.
This time a rad hose let go, even more antifreeze sprayed the entire engine compartment down! :crazy:
Now what?

A discussion, and we decided to re-route the coolant such that the engine would use river water (cold) and exhaust that after going through the block over the side.
By now it was apparent that the engine was producing pressure into the coolant - a cracked head, or bad head gasket being the most likely culprits. And our Green Lady was obviously out of the running for our intended destination...
A couple more miles, and we shut down for the night, and to debate what this meant for our hunt...
"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

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Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by IronNoggin » Fri Oct 05, 2018 4:15 pm

There was never even a passing thought of abandoning the hunt.
We discussed possibilities into the night, and decided if Green Death could get up for another hour or so, we would be into an area we had explored many years ago. That area is adjacent to Terminus Mountain, and we well know it holds a decent amount of moose & elk in the lowlands, and sheep plus goats up top.

Decision made, we settled in for the night as the wolves serenaded us off to dreamland...

The next early morn, we set off again, albeit at a notably reduced pace...

Green Death initially held her own, and we could see Terminus approaching in the distance:

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Before we could get there though, the big mill began to sputter and complain again. Thankfully we were rather close to the new destination, and we managed to nurse the boat into an island below the big mountain.

Terminus:

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Given the status of the main rig, this Island was obviously going to be the base of our operations for the duration.
Green Death's owner drug out the tool kit, and went right to work trying to determine actual issues rather than guessing.
The rest of us gathered up supplies and carved a campsite out of the bush:

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That big Teepee weighs mere ounces, folds down to nothing, has it's own stove, and is incredibly comfortable for four men!
First time I was along when it was used, and I was mightily IMPRESSED! :thumbup:
Camp was restructured several times, and became a comfortable home base.

Afterwards, the other boat's Pilot entertained our Camp Watcher by doing a little fishing.
That dog is RIGHT into it, and certainly lets you know when there is a bite!!
The catch (on a bare jig) was Dolly Vardens and Arctic Grayling - all of which were released.

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Next came The Council of Changed Plans, and how we would hunt as a consequence...
And once again, the wolves serenaded us as darkness draped the river valley...
"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

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Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by IronNoggin » Fri Oct 05, 2018 4:21 pm

Next up will be The Hunts. :wink:

My Mechanic just called - although I had an oil change done on my truck 2 days before we left, we put on so many miles she was due for another when we got back. That, and an adjustment to an errant airbag mount have been completed, and she is ready to roll again. So, I am off to bring her home. Bit of a hike, and have to pick up dinner supplies along the way.

Will try to get back to this later today. If not, tomorrow morning for sure...

Cheers,
Nog
"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

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Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by paulaboutform » Fri Oct 05, 2018 5:21 pm

DANG IT!!! .....I should've waited for the whole story! :eusa-doh:

Paul

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Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by janesy » Fri Oct 05, 2018 7:37 pm

Wait... What,? You stopped this adventure for an oil change? :wtf:

What happened to green death? I can't take this pressure, I feel like an 8 year old at bed time.

Those mountains are tremendous. I can't imagine how humbling it must feel to be in there
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Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by mr meat » Fri Oct 05, 2018 8:56 pm

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Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by IronNoggin » Sat Oct 06, 2018 12:59 pm

The Hunts

From our base camp noted above, we could scan the frontal faces of Terminus and another set of hills.
So, the two spotting scopes were set up and manned almost constantly from the moment camp was established.
It wasn't difficult to spot the several groups of goats up there, but the only one that looked like he needed a closer inspection always (and I mean always) was seen in areas impossible to get anywhere near without wings. Still, a watchful eye was on him frequently in the hope he would eventually offer an opportunity...

There were several groups of rams, and a handful of ewes & lambs on those hillsides as well.
Despite staring at them so hard it felt like our eyes were being sucked out of our heads, we simply could not make any of the rams grow the extra few inches required for an uphill effort. One thing I did notice about those rams was that several (over half in fact) were sporting deep & wide curls, indicating great promise for the next few years of developing some very fine sets of horns. That mountain and area has always been known for tight-curl rams (not lengthy) with minimal examples of the Argali style flare. Looks to me as though that is changing there now. Can't really understand the why, but certainly can and did recognize the what. Days were spent analyzing each ram in full detail. One looked as if he would be "just shy", while the balance were lesser that that. Terminus is among the first mountains hit by the outfitter crew each year, and it is often said that by the end of the first day or two, all the legal rams will be taken. Heard it had some rather intense pressure on the opener this year, and to us, it rather did look like a clean sweep had been accomplished...

Elk season was nearing it's end by now, so we decided to put a little effort into seeing if we could dig up a bull or two.
Mornings and evenings would find us hidden in natural blinds, and calling to entice anyone within hearing range to respond.
During the days, those not manning spotting scopes were quietly prowling in wide searches for sign.
And sign there was! From wallows to scrapes to bootprints, it was obvious some were about.
And we did get the odd reply from both sides of the valley, letting us know the bulls were there, but wary.

One encounter was quite the rush for my local Partner.
He had never called in a bull before, and so had spent a fair amount of time earlier in the fall practicing bugling and cow chirping until he had it down pat. A couple of mornings after we landed in this spot, he and I crept out well before the first light, and set up in an area that would allow us to watch any approach from most angles, and especially so downwind. At the first fairly quiet bugle he let go, there was an immediate response that echoed eerily through the chilly morning's frost. :wtf:
Almost sounds too good I muttered.
But when challenged again a few minutes later, it was obvious this was the Real McCoy, and headed right at us like a heat seeking missile!!
My Buddy's eyes started to glow, and he actually gave a few twitches that gave away the level of adrenaline roaring through his veins at that moment.
The bull closed quickly, taking perhaps 20 minutes to cover over a kilometer. Only to stall out in some dense timber. A few cow chirps was enough to get him raking the trees violently, while gorilla grunting the whole time. Eventually he could stand it no more, and roared into the open, threw back his head, and roared his own challenge into the brisk air. It was chilly enough his breath seemed to hang for hours. Binocs up, One, Two, Three, Four, Five... again. Same result. This was a huge bodied very mature bull that was never going to grow a sixth point. Bases were monstrous, and it was obvious that he considered himself King of this particular mountain!

Although a little disappointment, my Buddy swelled with pride as he put his rifle down. I did it! I actually called that bugger right in! From the corner of my eye I could see his hands shaking a little, and fondly recalled the first bull I called in myself so many years ago. And yeah, as I recall, there was a little shaking on in my hands that morning too!!

The bull swung his head from side to side seeking his adversary. Not finding him caused him to vent his anger repeatedly to the sky. Was one hell of a fine experience, and we both saluted this magnificent creature as he slowly headed back up the mountain...

Back at camp this occurrence spurred a rather lively debate on the effectiveness of antler point restrictions on game management. Almost all of the Western States that had at one time tried these restrictions ended up doing away with them, and many the paper has been written as to why. In some of those areas, 5 point elk became the dominant breeders as the 6 points basically no longer existed. The same holds true for Mule deer wherein large 3 and even 2 points become the dominant mature bucks under 4 point only restrictions. I believe what we saw that morning was another manifestation of this syndrome, as that elk was as old and big as he is ever going to be. Odd that BC, and in many cases even Alberta seem driven to re-invent the wheel in this matter...

A few more elk were heard over the next two days, and more sightings uphill of not only sheep & goats, but several large black bears, and a small handful of elk. Interesting for sure, but not putting much in the way of food in our bellies, and the MRE's were getting a tad redundant...

One morning we awoke to an obvious impending weather change. It had been cool, and heavy frosts developed most mornings, but all under clear skies. This morning there was but little frost, and the red sky at morning spoke loudly to the two offshoremen in our camp. She's changing...

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So, we decided to change up our strategy for the day, to explore another area, and to expand our horizons just a little. We loaded up the smaller jet with a couple day's worth of rations, a couple tarps, the hound and all four of us. Target was the Frog River system, and off we went, stopping to explore areas of interest along the way. The amount of sign of moose and elk was promising, but there were also a good number of black & grizzly bear bootprints, and the ever-present trails of the wolves...

During this run the weather did indeed turn, and the snow began to literally pummel the high hills. Here's a few shots I took along the way:

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The Frog was a little down from last year, and the sledding was exhilarating in the skinny water.
This was the last day of elk season, so we had hopes of locating a good bull further up the Frog drainage which is well known to harbor decent numbers of them. We spread mean out in enticing spots to call from time to time, and wandered many side channels and meadows looking. Although the sign was there, there were NO responses to our calls....

Upon rounding one sharp corner in the river a giant 6 point bull and 3 cows were caught in the open, 1/2 across the skinny channel. Our eyes merely grazed him as he lit out like his tail was on fire, straight through the thick stuff and madly up a steep hillside! His run was so swift none of had a chance to do anything but stare in shock as he disappeared like so much smoke. No way he was going to reply to a call, so we decided against educating him in that matter, and carried on. That spelt the end of the elk ambitions (but not sightings) for this year's hunt.

A few hours later we dropped in at the Trappers Cabin to sign the Guest Book once more. Quite a few names have been added since I was last there, and a new roof appears to be damn near completed. One day I would like to shake the hands of the men who brave this country in the dead of winter in pursuit of fur!!

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We did note a goat down low right from the beach in front of the cabin, but quickly determined he was a semi-mature billy of no interest to our group. The wander home required the balance of the day, and we went to bed stuffed with military rations once again...
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Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by xcaliber » Sat Oct 06, 2018 1:21 pm

Pictures are amazing, sounds like another great adventure Nog!
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Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by IronNoggin » Sat Oct 06, 2018 2:19 pm

After the previous day's efforts, I found myself a little worn out. And so it was that I found myself stirring from slumber, only to discover I had slept in some. As I laid there wondering what the rest of the trip might bring, I heard the far off moaning of a cow moose. Hmmm... Did I imagine that? Nope, there it is again!!

Scrambling I was soon in my heavy camo to brace against the morning chill, rifle in hand, and was preparing to head out in the direction of those calls.

Kid's pretty good came a hushed whisper across the campsite.
Huh?
Yeah, that's him that got you going. Any bull hears that he may well respond.
Only ever remember hearing anyone better, and that was an ancient Cree in Northern Saskatchewan decades ago...


Just then the call came again, and DAMN! He is GOOD!
Always prided myself on my efforts to call moose, and have been downright successful doing that over the years.
But this was magical. Better than I had ever been, and still had me yearning to run out there with a ready rifle!

When my Buddy returned to camp, we all congratulated him on his calling.
He blushed with hidden pride, and accepted the comments in a reluctant manner.
Little did we know just what the effect of those calls would have on our next couple of days...

We spent much of the day again watching the animals on Terminus, and their response to the snow that had accumulated.
Most had dropped down a fair bit, but the Big Goat, and the better of the young rams still held court on the highest of country.

Towards late afternoon, we decided to head over to a huge set of moose meadows we knew of which were not much more than a couple miles away. Again we loaded up the little jet rig for a possible extended stay, and again off we went to explore.
As we got to the channel that leads to the meadows, a HUGE Bull Moose appeared - feeding along the side of the channel about 200 yards out...

We immediately landed, and a spotting scope was set up FAST. Moose have to have 3 up front, ten around, or be a spike/fork in order to be legal in that zone. A shift in the breeze suddenly carried our scent his way, and the reaction was immediate! As he turned the spotter murmured I count 12 one side! All I needed!! As the bull raced dead away, I lined up on the back of his neck just below the base of his skull. A little over 250 yards now, bullet would be still climbing from my ancient 300 Weatherby, so I adjusted slightly down the spine. BOOM! The rifle bucked almost unexpectedly against my shoulder, only to come down back on target to see him shake his huge head violently, and race into the timber!!
WTH? 180 partition didn't simply dump him at that range??

We backed off for an hour and a half, collected the tracking dog and his leash, and went in for a boo. The bull had run 100 yards uphill, then laid down. Two drops of blood was all. And he had departed well before we entered the picture. The next few hours were spent behind the dog as he worked out the exit trail. At 3/4 of a mile, darkness dropped over us like a suddenly dropped wet blanket, and we had to return to the boat and make our way back to camp with the aid of headlamps. The moose had not laid down again. At camp the other Ladz jokingly accused me of shootin' for the horns, suggesting I may have put one into an antler. No damn way, I KNOW where that hit...

It was a tough night of little sleep for me. I kept going over the shot in my mind, wondering just what the hell had gone wrong. Before daybreak I was up drinking coffee in the morning's chill, waiting for the rest of my crew to rise and accompany me for an extended tracking effort. Picking up the trail where we had left it the night before, we began to decipher where it lead from there. Into a bunch of deadfall that literally took hours to struggle through. He knew we were in pursuit. And he had not laid down yet again. At another 3/4 of a mile, our crew was drenched in sweat, and more than a little disappointed. Back to camp to rethink and regroup was my suggestion. It was well taken, and it wasn't until early afternoon we made a late breakfast back in camp.

While we were chowing down, the dog suddenly began his I SEE SOMETHING YOU SHOULD LOOK AT whine!
My Alberta Buddy & I glanced over, and saw a monster of a bull moose slightly upstream of the camp, knee deep and swallowing great amounts of water from the river! Nobody Panic (worse thing to say as invariably everyone does each time you say it) and a mad scramble ensued. I nodded towards our Young Gun and smiled at the tall Albertan. Yep.
Danny, get your rifle on him I said, having already centered my scope on the 200 yard distant bull. I count 12 one side came the comment from the man behind the rapidly deployed spotting scope!

My Friend, shoot that bugger right in the heart were my words that followed.
Ka-BOOM!
The bull simply collapsed like a cheap lawn chair, nose first, right into the river!
WOAH! :clap:

Another mad scramble to get the small jet rig launched, as the current pushed the bull towards our shore.
Minutes later a couple ropes were secured, and we managed to push the bugger right to the beach, less than 75 yards from camp!
Did I say BIG?
Check out the size compared to the jet rig!!

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There was absolutely no way the four of us could ever drag or push the weight up onto that beach!
So, drawing straws and two men donned the boots.
Quartering the high side kept the meat clean & dry...

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After which we were able to roll him up onto the beach to finish processing him:

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While doing so, we came across a bullet hole in the back of his neck, just below the base of his skull.
And a little digging produced a perfectly mushroomed 30 caliber Nosler Partition.
How that did not drop him on the spot I will never know.
He is only the second of dozens of animals that rifle has taken not to literally drop in their tracks.

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We also found another bullet track, one that both entered and exited.
Along it's path, it found the exact item I had requested:

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We all were grinning at recovering the big boy, and at the mountain of meat he provided us!
No more MRE's!!!

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IronNoggin
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Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by IronNoggin » Sat Oct 06, 2018 2:46 pm

My Young Partner has always dreamed of taking a moose over 50 inches.
Well this time, that dream came through in spades!!
And of course there were the mandatory Trophy Shots to be taken...

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The pictures don't really do that bad boy much justice.
He was near 9 feet at the shoulder, and likely weighed in around 1,400 pounds.
He produced just over 500 pounds of boneless meat, which I am happy to report had a great flavor, and was downright tender!
Well before the rut, and damn fat!!

That night's dinner was something special for all of us!!

Image

We rested a day after that happy happening, and gorged ourselves on this wonderful bull.
Prepping for the next chapter to come... The Mountain Assault!

In the interest of Happy Wife, Happy Life, I unfortunately will have to quit here for the day.
She Who Rules is off today, and apparently I am somewhat involved in the daily schedule...

More to come Folks. Back atcha in the am...

Cheers,
Nog
"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

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IronNoggin
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Joined: Tue Dec 27, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Port Alberni, Vancouver Island

Re: A Kechika River Adventure

Post by IronNoggin » Sat Oct 06, 2018 2:59 pm

Just a quick side note before I wander...

The bullet out of the 300 Weatherby penetrated right to the bone, several inches below the base of the skull.
It had caused great bruising, a few hairline fractures, and given the amount of blood in both ears, most likely permanently deafened the moose.
I am still at a loss as to why.
I did check several others from that lot by pulling the bullet and weighing out the powder.
It is right where it should be.
Guess this one gets to remain a mystery to me...

Cheers,
Nog
"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end."

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