Multigenerational twist

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Stepnoutnb
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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by Stepnoutnb » Mon Jun 03, 2019 8:17 pm

Boo wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 6:55 pm
Mark, give your boy a hug and a kiss and let him be his own man. It's important that a man knows that he is where he is because he put himself there! Nothing better than knowing that you are responsible for your own destiny.
XB buddy. Your dad is way cool! I like him! :D
Well said!
I'm 62 my dad is 87 A greater man I've never met! My Grandparents, his parents came to Canada around 1907. It was a tough life. My dad was the baby of 18. He is the last one alive. I have 5 siblings he taught us to be accountable for every move we made. If you did it, you own it, if it was wrong, make it right. Not disgracing your family was BIG!

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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by xcaliber » Mon Jun 03, 2019 8:27 pm

papa bear1 wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 8:54 am
longbow joe wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 8:08 pm
Try living in a house full of women .....even the dogs a girl.l get sent out to the garage a lot. ...lts really not that bad my boat and hunting fishing stuff is in there. And a fridge fulla beer.
I wanna come to your garage, :lol: :thumbup:
I'll pick you up! :lol: :lol: :lol:
Joe's a HOOT! :eusa-dance:
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Montana Mark
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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by Montana Mark » Mon Jun 03, 2019 9:55 pm

Thanks for all the support guys. Yesterday was a rough day. It’s better today. It’s hard to let go. He’s growing into a fine man. I’m proud of him. Good idea XBOIGO on the military. I almost did the army scholarship and chickened out. I joined the Air Force reserves later while in training for some extra cash. Loved the comic relief on the houseful of women topic. (I find it strange that I am in a houseful of women and I do 90% of the cooking. My wife says she cooks Wednesday’s but she almost always orders take out and has me pick it up on the way home from work.). I still have many reasons not to buy my dads big house even if he will give me a good deal. I like the simple life and to have the cash reserves to spoil my family (they usually let me).
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Montana Mark
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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by Montana Mark » Mon Jun 03, 2019 10:39 pm

Besides. I love my little place in the country. It reminds me of the pictures I’ve seen of the old family farm in Sweden. My house is small and simple with board batten sides. I have a little barn and numerous sheds with a flag pole in the middle. I’ve even painted it up to look like the old Swedish farm. 100 foot ponderosa pines all around. National forest out the back. I could probably walk 50 miles and only cross 2 dirt roads. I do crazy projects all over it (my neighbors must think I’m nuts). I garden and raise small livestock. I finished the fences and am set up for ponies. I once dug a pond but my wife made me fill it in (did it Impulsively in the spring). Thinking of that, I can finally tie this post to crossbows. Every late winter/spring, I get impulsive (I call it spring fever—nonclinical term). This year, it just happened to be “crossbow fever”. Last year, I decided to take my family to Hawaii—now that was fun. Anyway, thank you all for the support.
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Montana Mark
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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by Montana Mark » Tue Jun 04, 2019 12:26 am

Boy now I’m really getting off topic. The pond story is actually very funny. At our house, we don’t talk about “the pond”. I actually refer to it as “my midlife crisis”. I have a handyman named Ali (I consider him a friend/almost brother) who helps me and my dad with projects. While fixing up my house, we would take a water break under a tree and I would often say “wouldn’t a pond look good in the meadow”. The next year, I had some digging projects so I rented a couple machines and hired Ali and his buddy to pull down the leaning chimney, bury it, dig a hole for the propane tank, and trench a water line to the barn. I staked out a 30 foot circle for a pond and said if we finish the other projects, we can dig a small duck pond in the meadow. I had to work in the hospital that morning and when I got back they were going to town digging a big pond. I freaked but Ali reassured me they were digging my dream pond that would hold trout and have a rope swing for the kids. I was easily convinced and we dug a nice big deep pond. (I forgot to mention that my wife was out of town.). We started on the other projects (which were supposed to be done first) and didn’t finish anything. My wife came home and the place looked like a scene from the movie “saving private Ryan”. Needless to say I had to hire a “professional” to clean it all up and push the pond in. It cost more than twice as much to bury the pond as it did to dig it. I planted grass and clover and you can never tell it happened. The clover in the meadow is lush and thick and (ok, here is a crossbow link again) the deer come out there every night (20-30 yards from my driveway). I suppose I could call the pond “the most expensive food plot ever” instead of “my midlife crisis”. As midlife crisis’ go, it was pretty cheap compared to a sports car or a girlfriend. Besides I got the pond idea out of my system (and I’m still married).
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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by papa bear1 » Tue Jun 04, 2019 8:50 am

xcaliber wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 8:27 pm
papa bear1 wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 8:54 am
longbow joe wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 8:08 pm
Try living in a house full of women .....even the dogs a girl.l get sent out to the garage a lot. ...lts really not that bad my boat and hunting fishing stuff is in there. And a fridge fulla beer.
I wanna come to your garage, :lol: :thumbup:
I'll pick you up! :lol: :lol: :lol:
Joe's a HOOT! :eusa-dance:
:eusa-dance: :eusa-dance: :eusa-clap: :eusa-clap: :eusa-clap: :thumbup: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Lets go. :eusa-dance:
Be safe in all you do! See ya in the woods!!!
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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by Boo » Tue Jun 04, 2019 9:16 am

Montana Mark wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 12:26 am
Boy now I’m really getting off topic. The pond story is actually very funny. At our house, we don’t talk about “the pond”. I actually refer to it as “my midlife crisis”. I have a handyman named Ali (I consider him a friend/almost brother) who helps me and my dad with projects. While fixing up my house, we would take a water break under a tree and I would often say “wouldn’t a pond look good in the meadow”. The next year, I had some digging projects so I rented a couple machines and hired Ali and his buddy to pull down the leaning chimney, bury it, dig a hole for the propane tank, and trench a water line to the barn. I staked out a 30 foot circle for a pond and said if we finish the other projects, we can dig a small duck pond in the meadow. I had to work in the hospital that morning and when I got back they were going to town digging a big pond. I freaked but Ali reassured me they were digging my dream pond that would hold trout and have a rope swing for the kids. I was easily convinced and we dug a nice big deep pond. (I forgot to mention that my wife was out of town.). We started on the other projects (which were supposed to be done first) and didn’t finish anything. My wife came home and the place looked like a scene from the movie “saving private Ryan”. Needless to say I had to hire a “professional” to clean it all up and push the pond in. It cost more than twice as much to bury the pond as it did to dig it. I planted grass and clover and you can never tell it happened. The clover in the meadow is lush and thick and (ok, here is a crossbow link again) the deer come out there every night (20-30 yards from my driveway). I suppose I could call the pond “the most expensive food plot ever” instead of “my midlife crisis”. As midlife crisis’ go, it was pretty cheap compared to a sports car or a girlfriend. Besides I got the pond idea out of my system (and I’m still married).
Mark, I must say that I know what your mistake was. You should have carted away the dirt! The site would have looked much better than an excavation site and you would not have the material to put back in. At that point, just stick your arms out and say "hey, bad call" or "my bad". Planning, planning, planning! :thumbup:
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Montana Mark
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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by Montana Mark » Tue Jun 04, 2019 10:11 am

Boo wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 9:16 am
Montana Mark wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 12:26 am
Boy now I’m really getting off topic. The pond story is actually very funny. At our house, we don’t talk about “the pond”. I actually refer to it as “my midlife crisis”. I have a handyman named Ali (I consider him a friend/almost brother) who helps me and my dad with projects. While fixing up my house, we would take a water break under a tree and I would often say “wouldn’t a pond look good in the meadow”. The next year, I had some digging projects so I rented a couple machines and hired Ali and his buddy to pull down the leaning chimney, bury it, dig a hole for the propane tank, and trench a water line to the barn. I staked out a 30 foot circle for a pond and said if we finish the other projects, we can dig a small duck pond in the meadow. I had to work in the hospital that morning and when I got back they were going to town digging a big pond. I freaked but Ali reassured me they were digging my dream pond that would hold trout and have a rope swing for the kids. I was easily convinced and we dug a nice big deep pond. (I forgot to mention that my wife was out of town.). We started on the other projects (which were supposed to be done first) and didn’t finish anything. My wife came home and the place looked like a scene from the movie “saving private Ryan”. Needless to say I had to hire a “professional” to clean it all up and push the pond in. It cost more than twice as much to bury the pond as it did to dig it. I planted grass and clover and you can never tell it happened. The clover in the meadow is lush and thick and (ok, here is a crossbow link again) the deer come out there every night (20-30 yards from my driveway). I suppose I could call the pond “the most expensive food plot ever” instead of “my midlife crisis”. As midlife crisis’ go, it was pretty cheap compared to a sports car or a girlfriend. Besides I got the pond idea out of my system (and I’m still married).
Mark, I must say that I know what your mistake was. You should have carted away the dirt! The site would have looked much better than an excavation site and you would not have the material to put back in. At that point, just stick your arms out and say "hey, bad call" or "my bad". Planning, planning, planning! :thumbup:

We just ran out of time. We could have done it all if we had stuck to my plans but it was a failure in leadership on my part. My little duck pond along the curve of my driveway would have blended in nicely. Maybe I’ll dig it again someday. I keep watching the classifieds for a little kubota tractor. If I get one, I’ll wait till my wife takes a trip and dig a small pond like I intended.
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flightattendant100
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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by flightattendant100 » Tue Jun 04, 2019 3:18 pm

Boo, Montana Mark, Y’all are both WRONG! Marry a flight attendant. Before the “pond” was filled in, she would have to leave on a trip. Problem solved! Amateurs!

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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by jody5252 » Tue Jun 04, 2019 4:46 pm

:lol:
longbow joe wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 8:08 pm
Try living in a house full of women .....even the dogs a girl.l get sent out to the garage a lot. ...lts really not that bad my boat and hunting fishing stuff is in there. And a fridge fulla beer.
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Montana Mark
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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by Montana Mark » Tue Jun 04, 2019 5:11 pm

flightattendant100 wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 3:18 pm
Boo, Montana Mark, Y’all are both WRONG! Marry a flight attendant. Before the “pond” was filled in, she would have to leave on a trip. Problem solved! Amateurs!
My wife takes trips all the time. My wife and I both do our own thing and rarely together. We’re both fine with it. I once went on a men’s church retreat and one of the men suggested that myself and my wife go on a trip together— just the two of us. Before I could check my reaction, I looked at him scared and astonished and said “you mean on purpose?!”.
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SEW
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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by SEW » Thu Jun 06, 2019 11:21 pm

Boo wrote:
Mon Jun 03, 2019 6:55 pm
Mark, give your boy a hug and a kiss and let him be his own man. It's important that a man knows that he is where he is because he put himself there! Nothing better than knowing that you are responsible for your own destiny.
XB buddy. Your dad is way cool! I like him! :D
I was about to respond since I’ve been in your own situation but paid my own way (and GI Bill) and helped my kids. Unfortunately, one was a large co-signed loan for cropdusting school ($50K +) and a drug ridden life followed which drained even more trying to rescue.

I’ve recommended the following to one of my daughters who has an exceptionally good, moral 16 year old daughter. Tell her exactly just how much she’ll allow for each of 4 years of college. That way the child can plan accordingly. Different colleges, schools, etc cost radically different.
$300K-$600K is not unusual for physicians or dental specialists . That’s not easy to pay off. Interest is terrible. Been there, done that but mine was “only” $80K. The grand daughter is considering a College of the School of the Ozarks (Branson, MO) which is no cost but the students work 18-21 hrs/week. If she does that, she’ll have a good start money wise to start her life after college.

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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by ihunt » Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:34 pm

longbow joe wrote:
Sun Jun 02, 2019 8:08 pm
Try living in a house full of women .....even the dogs a girl.l get sent out to the garage a lot. ...lts really not that bad my boat and hunting fishing stuff is in there. And a fridge fulla beer.
Ha I'm in the same boat! Dog and women in my house ( not necessary in that order lol) but the girls in mine home got the fridge in my garage full of juice, milk and fruits! :(
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Re: Multigenerational twist

Post by grouse » Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:55 pm

The cost of college tuition went through the roof when college loans became readily available and commonplace, just like the cost of medical care went up when lots of people started getting medical insurance. When you're not paying (at least at the moment) the sky is the limit. I received my bachelors degree in 1973 from a major state university. I had no scholarships and paid my tuition as I went along by working full time in the summer and working a lot during the school year. I lived very frugally, and had roomates, but I graduated debt free. With the cost of college today, that would be tough to do.
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